It Pays to Be Herr Kaiser Germans With Noble-Sounding Surnames More Often Work as Managers Than as Employees

Abstract : In the field study reported here (N = 222,924), we found that Germans with noble-sounding surnames, such as Kaiser ("emperor"), König ("king"), and Fürst ("prince"), more frequently hold managerial positions than Germans with last names that either refer to common everyday occupations, such as Koch ("cook"), Bauer ("farmer"), and Becker/Bäcker ("baker"), or do not refer to any social role. This phenomenon occurs despite the fact that noble-sounding surnames never indicated that the person actually held a noble title. Because of basic properties of associative cognition, the status linked to a name may spill over to its bearer and influence his or her occupational outcomes.
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Article dans une revue
Psychological Science, Association for Psychological Science, 2013, 24 (12), pp.2437-2444. 〈10.1177/0956797613494851〉
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Soumis le : jeudi 17 avril 2014 - 16:30:15
Dernière modification le : jeudi 11 janvier 2018 - 06:19:32

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Raphael Silberzahn, Eric Luis Uhlmann. It Pays to Be Herr Kaiser Germans With Noble-Sounding Surnames More Often Work as Managers Than as Employees. Psychological Science, Association for Psychological Science, 2013, 24 (12), pp.2437-2444. 〈10.1177/0956797613494851〉. 〈hal-00980265〉

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