The Stuff of Which Names are Made: A Look at the Colorful and Eclectic Namecraft of Lord Dunsany

Abstract : Lord Dunsany's prolific namecraft provides a rich field for study, but poses difficulties for traditional approaches to names in literature, which typically seek out the hidden meanings or symbolisms of isolated names. An alternative approach is to look for trends in the forms and substances of the author's inventions as a whole. To this end, Émile Souriau's threefold typology of neologisms proves useful. In the first category, Dunsany camouflages pre-existing vocables of diverse origins. In the second, he employs anglicized versions of forms identified with foreign languages and nomenclatures, though he does not introduce actual foreign sounds. In the third, he constructs names from morphological building blocks. Whether English or foreign, Dunsany divests his source materials of their original referents, yet retains traces of their idiomatic provenance. Colorful and eclectic, his inventions resonate within a mythopoetic encyclopedia of diverse literary, historical, and cultural traditions.
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Article dans une revue
Names: A Journal of Onomastics, Maney Publishing, 2012, 60 (1), pp.26-35
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Contributeur : Amaury Bouvet <>
Soumis le : dimanche 8 juillet 2012 - 18:40:23
Dernière modification le : mardi 18 décembre 2012 - 20:33:04

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  • HAL Id : hal-00715592, version 1

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Christopher L. Robinson. The Stuff of Which Names are Made: A Look at the Colorful and Eclectic Namecraft of Lord Dunsany. Names: A Journal of Onomastics, Maney Publishing, 2012, 60 (1), pp.26-35. 〈hal-00715592〉

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