Spokesperson Fame and Vividness Effects in the Context of Issue-Relevant Thinking: The Moderating Role of Competitive Setting - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Journal of Consumer Research Year : 1994

Spokesperson Fame and Vividness Effects in the Context of Issue-Relevant Thinking: The Moderating Role of Competitive Setting

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Abstract

Primarily on the basis of research from noncompetitive settings, it is generally believed that nonsubstantive advertising features are ineffective when consumers engage in issue-relevant thinking. Experiment 1 of the current study replicated prior research. Neither spokesperson fame nor the vividness of advertising copy influenced attitudes in noncompetitive settings. However, these same features proved effective in the context of balanced competition. When brands were homogenous (experiment 2) or characterized by large price-quality trade-offs (experiment 3), nonsubstantive features improved attitudes and choice probabilities despite issue-relevant thinking. When trade-offs were small, however, nonsubstantive features were again ineffective. The results suggest that balanced competition can neutralize the effects of substantive features, increase indecision, and promote perceptual contrast. These effects then empower nonsubstantive features to serve as heuristics and/or reduce the risk of postpreference regret.
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Dates and versions

hal-00670493 , version 1 (15-02-2012)

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  • HAL Id : hal-00670493 , version 1

Cite

Timothy B. Heath, Michael S. Mccarthy, David L. Mothersbaugh. Spokesperson Fame and Vividness Effects in the Context of Issue-Relevant Thinking: The Moderating Role of Competitive Setting. Journal of Consumer Research, 1994, vol. 20, issue 4, pp. 520-534. ⟨hal-00670493⟩

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